Chaz Berman, business growth, AgTech,

Grower's Secret recently appeared in the StartUpCity 15 Most Promising AgTech Startups - 2018 list.

In the article, Grower's Secret's CEO, Chaz Berman describes the discovery and evolution of its innovative products and well as describing Grower's Secret's anchor product, GSP (Grower's Secret Professional).

"GSP, which is not a fertilizer, but a plant growth stimulator, helps the plant open its roots at the cellular level and absorb more nutrients and water. This is thought to be done by helping the plant complete an already existing gene expression. GSP is a cheerleader that helps the plant kickstart this process!"

organics, organic, healthy living

Avocados–Fewer than 1% avocados tested positive for pesticides.

(CNN) – You can protect yourself from cancer by eating organic, a new study suggests. Those who frequently eat organic foods lowered their overall risk of developing cancer, a study published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine finds. Specifically, those who primarily eat organic foods were more likely to ward off non-Hod- gkin lymphoma and postmenopausal breast cancer compared to those who rarely or never ate organic foods.

  • More than 68,000 French adults took part in the study
  • Those who ate the most organic food were 25% less likely to develop cancer

Led by Julia Baudry, an epidemiologist at Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale in France, a team of researchers looked at the diets of 68,946 French adults. More than three-quar- ters of the volunteers were women, in their mid-40s on average. These volunteers were categorized into four groups depending on how often they reported eating 16 organic products, including fruits and vegetables, meat and fish, ready-to-eat meals, vegeta- ble oils and condiments, dietary supplements and other products.

environment, GS Nitrogen

From the NPR blog, All Things Considered
Author: Dan Charles.

The Environmental Defense Fund opened an office near Walmart's headquarters in Bentonville, Ark., 10 years ago. It was part of a carefully plotted strategy to persuade the giant retailer that going green could be good for business. If it worked, it certainly could be good for the planet — Walmart's revenues are bigger than the entire economy of most countries.

"We really saw that working with companies could be transformative at a scale that was pretty unmatched," says Suzy Friedman, a senior director at EDF.

If you're looking for evidence that the strategy is working, there's this: Last year, Walmart unveiled Project Gigaton, a plan to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases by a billion tons of carbon between now and 2030. That's almost as much carbon as what's released from the country's entire fleet of passenger cars and trucks in a year.

The cuts will come from the company's suppliers: the vast galaxy of companies that make the products it sells.

Scientists debate a new way of understanding flora.

The New Yorker just published the following article that explores the question, Are Plants Intelligent?

In 1973, a book claiming that plants were sentient beings that feel emotions, prefer classical music to rock and roll, and can respond to the unspoken thoughts of humans hundreds of miles away landed on the New York Timesbest-seller list for nonfiction. “The Secret Life of Plants,” by Peter Tompkins and Christopher Bird, presented a beguiling mashup of legitimate plant science, quack experiments, and mystical nature worship that captured the public imagination at a time when New Age thinking was seeping into the mainstream.